Even rain would be better

This last month we’ve had what could only be called bleah weather. The days begin with such promise. There is cloud up really high and visibility is well beyond 50 miles. Infinity really. But this darn cloud is thick enough that the sun doesn’t pierce and by about 2:00pm we head into a twilight that lasts ’til 5:00pm. You simply end up being truly thankful when you can close the curtains on the whole day.
The thing is I’m really not like this usually. I’m really thinking of going to a sun-bed for a shot of rays.

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16 Responses to Even rain would be better

  1. Kelly says:

    I think that would depress me. Not to the point that I’d say I have SAD (seasonal affective disorder), but I do need my sunlight.

    Should I wish some rain on you?

    • V.H says:

      I think SAD is a function of a few things most of them to do with things being out of balance. I think after last year and winter we are very low on Vit D and while this summer was generally OK there isn’t any reserves.
      And it’s a quality of light too. This is just miserable and mean. But no, no one would really wish for rain in truth.

  2. Kimberly says:

    I suppose it’s not very good picture taking weather either.

    • V.H says:

      Horrible. Utterly f-bomb horrible.

      • Kimberly says:

        Funnily enough, I just got home from running around today, and it’s sunny as can be but pouring down rain. It’s very rare that I’ve got to carry an umbrella while wearing my sunglasses. :). Usually the sky is like soup when it rains here.

        • V.H says:

          Was it a kind of squall where you could see it cross the city towards you. We get them in summer. It can really be tipping it down and you can see the sun shining all round you.
          Did it clear the crap out of the air.

          • Kimberly says:

            Ya, very clear. It was a pretty day, just odd.
            I got sidetracked before and forgot to mention that I saw a movie today that was partly filmed in your neck of the woods – Rosecrea? It’s called Philomena. It’s a sweet film, and of course, the cinematography was gorgeous.

            • V.H says:

              Roscrea, near enough. I haven’t seen it, nor do I think I’ll ever see it. But I know the story very well. And it’s about bloody time that the scum and dirt were exposed to the light. That people within the system were convinced they were doing good is neither here or there when the system was designed and built with pure racism at it’s core.
              They are saying it might get Dench a few awards. How is the film flying over in your town. I wouldn’t have thought it was exactly mainstream middle America cinema product.

              • Kimberly says:

                It’s getting pretty good reviews here. I don’t know if it’s playing in middle America, but most things make it to LA and NYC, especially if there’s award talk. While to story touches on the laundries, it was more about the mother’s search for her son 50 years later and even then, she faced cover ups and run arounds. Steve Coogan plays the journalist who helped her and he was quite good too. I’ve mostly seen him in silly stuff, but he did a good job. The movie is based on the book (which I haven’t read), but I’m not sure if the producers screwed around with the story like they usually do. I did read a review that mentioned it was fairly accurate however the nuns came off far better in the book than they do in the movie.
                While I am somewhat familiar with what had happened, I hadn’t realized the children taken away from the young mothers were adopted primarily by Americans.

                • V.H says:

                  Oh this was an entirely different type of prison. The laundries were for those that couldn’t afford this place. But the laundries were primarily a slave factory under the guise of aiding the girls not as in this case baby factories.
                  Say you have a girl who is seduced or convinces herself through greed or whatever and ends up with a baby in her belly. Now factor in a family with a theoretic good name and a colonial society based on racism. Then put in a clergyman( I say clergyman for this occurred with all denominations) and probably a doctor you have one major manufactured problem. The very wealthy girls were watched like hawks. But if they became pregnant were moved to the UK and from the UK here or France or Europe generally for a “”Grand Tour””. This place was a step or two lower. Still with the cash to ‘lodge’ the girl and her kid.
                  At core though, many of these “””””adoptions”””” were if not forced then coerced.

                  I would have said solely by Americans. Certainly 90%, with the rest going to the UK.

                  • Kimberly says:

                    In this story, they paid a 1000 pounds to adopt the babies and, in this case, her son was taken without her permission. I’ve got the book on my list as I think it will tell more than the movie is able to.
                    I saw three movies this week off, including the Book Theif, and this one was by far the best of the three.

                    • V.H says:

                      For a lot of people £1000 would have been a years pay. University fees for a year would have been £250ish.

  3. Ed says:

    I miss the sun during the winter here and cherish the times that it is out. Fortunately for us, we have had three or four days now of bright sunshine but along with that it has been bitterly cold. You just can’t have it all!

    • V.H says:

      About three or four times a year we get this stillness. It would be delightful but for the cloud way up high. But the only thing worse is when the weather system sitting over us has low cloud at about 500ft.

  4. sage says:

    We are not quite as dark as that, but I really like winter’s light and find myself cherishing the morning and evening twilight and the long nights when I read of things like sailing in the South Pacific. Your description reminds me of what I remember from C. S. Lewis’ description of hell in “The Great Divorce,” a place where it is always gloomy, not dark enough that the lights give off a warm glow, just gloomy. (I hope that description didn’t ruin your day. In a little over 3 weeks, it’ll start getting better)

    • V.H says:

      No, you are that bit further south. I can tell you it really makes the difference sometimes. I can tell you when your people left Scotland for the Carolinas, they might have been nostalgic for the home country but they weren’t nuts enough to return. All very well calling over to the Royal&Ancient they sure as shootin weren’t hanging about for more than one winter.

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